Money, Health, and Other Things

Educational Blog in the Area of Family and Consumer Sciences for the Middle Peninsula


1 Comment

[Replay] Six Resume Writing Tips

Over the next two weeks, we’ll revisit our posts on resume writing and interview techniques. If you’re interested in learning more and attending a free resume writing and interview techniques workshop, check out our flyer below for our workshop in partnership with Virginia Career Works – Hampton Center

  1. Only include what is relevant and applicable to the position you’re applying for. This means omitting things like hobbies, and possibly excluding past employment, education, and skills that are not relevant to that specific job. This means that if you’re applying for multiple positions in different industries, you will likely need unique resumes for each of those positions. Also, remember that what’s relevant in one situation may not be relevant in another. One individual fresh out of college would likely want to include employment information during college and high school, to show some level of structured employment experience, while someone applying for the same job but with 20 years of relevant full-time experience should likely omit that information.
  2. When listing your job duties from past employment, be sure to describe what you specifically did using action verbs, and avoid vague terms like “assisted”, “contributed,” or “provided customer service.”
  3. List education and job history in reverse chronological order, most recent listed first. If your resume is growing too large, beyond the typical rule of thumbs of one to two pages, consider removing past employment information from more than 15 years ago, especially if it’s not related to the position you’re applying for.
  4. Don’t forget to include applicable skills, and relevant extracurricular and volunteer experiences – to some employers this can be just as valuable as previous employment experience.
  5. Include a cover letter – cover letters allow you to stand out and sell yourself in a more personal way that shows your interest in that specific position.
  6. For your section on education, if you have a college degree, you probably don’t need to include information about graduating high school. Additionally, for recent college graduates, a good rule of thumb is to exclude providing information on GPA unless it was 3.0 or higher.


1 Comment

[Replay] Ten Tips for Managing your Private Well Water Supply – Part II

This week, we’ll conclude our replay of previous posts on well water management in preparation for our upcoming well water clinic (see the flyer below!)This week we’ll discuss the final five of ten tips for managing your private well water supply.

6. All water tests should be done by a certified lab. After you receive your results, compare them to the standards set for public systems by the EPA, which generally serves as good guidelines for private systems, and feel free to contact us if you have any questions!

7. Inspect your well annually for any cracks, holes, or corrosion, and ensure your well cap is secure. Every three years, or if you suspect a problem sooner, have your well inspected by a licensed well drilling contractor with a Water Well and Pump classification. For a list of contactors who provide well inspections, check out Virginia Household Water Quality Program’s Wellcheck initiative linked below!

8. Keep careful records of your well installation, maintenance, inspection, and all water tests.

9. If a well on your property is no longer in use, have it properly abandoned by a licensed well contractor. Wells that are left unsealed or improperly abandoned can serve as a direct pathway for surface water to enter the groundwater supply, causing contamination. Remember, ground water is a shared resource

10. If you have a spring instead of a well, make sure the spring box is sealed to prevent contamination. Springs are very susceptible to contamination, so be sure to test your spring every year for coliform bacteria! Continuous treatment for bacteria is often required to ensure spring water is safe to drink.

If you’re interested in getting your well water tested, please check out the flyer below and contact Glenn Sturm (me!) at gjsturm@vt.edu or 804-815-9458!


1 Comment

[Replay] Ten Tips for Managing your Private Well Water Supply – Part I

Over the next few weeks, we’ll replay some of our posts on well water management in preparation for our upcoming well water clinic (see the flyer below!)This week we’ll discuss the first five of ten tips for managing your private well water supply.

  1. Make sure your well is properly constructed. Well casing should be 12” above the ground, with a sanitary, sealed well cap or secure concrete cover to prevent contamination from insects and surface water. Sanitary well caps for drilled wells often involve a two-piece cap with a rubber gasket, with vertical screws to hold the two pieces together and create a watertight seal. If you are unsure of your well construction, please check out Virginia Household Water Quality Program’s Wellcheck initiative linked here!
  2. Be sure the ground slopes away from your well to prevent surface water from pooling around the casing, which can cause contamination and damage your system.
  3. Ensure your well is at least 100 feet away from potential contamination sources, such as chemical storage, oil tanks, and septic tanks. If you have a septic tank, have it pumped regularly.
  4. Keep the area around your well clean and accessible. Make sure the area is free of debris, paint, motor oil, pesticides and fertilizers. Do not dump waste near your well or near sinkholes, as this may contaminate your water supply.
  5. Have your water tested once a year for total coliform bacteria, which will give an indication whether there is a likelihood of more dangerous bacteria present, like E. coli, that could potentially cause illness. If your total coliform and E. coli tests are done separately, consider doing the E. coli test if you have a positive total coliform test. Also, every three years, test for pH, total dissolved solids (TDS), nitrate, and other contaminants of local concern.

If you’re interested in getting your well water tested, please check out the flyer below and contact Glenn Sturm (me!) and gjsturm@vt.edu or 804-815-9458!